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dc.creatorŠpehar, Olga
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-12T12:11:38Z
dc.date.available2021-10-12T12:11:38Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-78491-193-5
dc.identifier.urihttp://reff.f.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/2037
dc.description.abstractSince the founding of Constantinople in AD 330, the Central Balkans were permanently under immediate or indirect influence of this, the capital of the Byzantine and later of the Ottoman empire. The spread of Christianity, newly legalised by the Edict of Milan, had a direct impact on the growing importance of the Constantine’s eastern imperial capital. The purchase of some of the most valuable relics from the Holy Land made it a Christian capital too.1 Christianity brought a completely different perspective to the almost spiritual importance that Constantinople would have within the whole of Europe for centuries to come.en
dc.publisherArchaeopress
dc.rightsrestrictedAccess
dc.sourceThe Danubian Lands between the Black, Aegean and Adriatic Seas: (7th Century BC-10th Century AD)
dc.titleThe imperial city of justiniana prima as a paradigm of constantinopolitan influence in the central balkansen
dc.typebookPart
dc.rights.licenseARR
dc.citation.epage233
dc.citation.other: 229-233
dc.citation.spage229
dc.identifier.rcubhttps://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_reff_2037
dc.identifier.scopus2-s2.0-85113863808
dc.type.versionpublishedVersion


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