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dc.creatorAnđelić, Sara
dc.creatorFilipović Đurđević, Dušica
dc.date.accessioned2023-11-02T16:37:12Z
dc.date.available2023-11-02T16:37:12Z
dc.date.issued2023
dc.identifier.urihttp://reff.f.bg.ac.rs/handle/123456789/5125
dc.description.abstractAccording to parallel distributed processing models, the mental representation of a word is distributed in the pattern of activation of basic units that represent its different features. In the case of different but related senses of polysemous words (e.g., head as part of the body and head as chief), the hypothesized activation patterns are similar. However, in the case of unrelated meanings of ambiguous words (homonyms), the hypothesized patterns are completely different (e.g., bank as an institution and bank as a river bank). In parallel, embodied cognition models see prior sensorimotor experience with an object as what constitutes a representation of the concept denoting the object. The aim of this research was to consider whether these two groups of models could be connected by considering sensorimotor information as basic units whose activation patterns carry information about meaning. Participants estimated the possibility of sensorimotor experience for individual senses/meanings of ambiguous words (e.g., river bank; N = 282). That way we collected sensorimotor norms on twelve sensorimotor scales (e.g., To what extent can ___ be (1)seen/(2)heard/(3)touched etc.). In order to address the research question, the norms were validated in the following two ways. First, we tested the difference in the mean similarity of sensorimotor experience between related (polysemic) senses and unrelated meanings (homonyms). The expected difference was observed: sensorimotor experiences were more similar for related senses (U = 1161.5, p < .001). To validate the norms the second way, we collected participant ratings of the semantic similarity of sense/meaning pairs. This similarity measure was found to be positively related to sensorimotor meaning similarity (r = .495, p < .001), supporting the hypotheses. Globally, these results suggest that there is a partial mapping of the semantic similarity continuum (the degree of separation of basic units) onto the sensorimotor similarity continuum and that it makes sense to consider sensorimotor information as a special type of basic unit that carries information about meaning. This research has produced useful resources for future research (sensorimotor norms, semantic similarity ratings) and pointed out the connection between two groups of models that, in a different but, as it turns out, compatible way, try to answer the same question: how the meaning of words is mentally represented.sr
dc.language.isoensr
dc.publisherInstitute for Psychology and Laboratory for Experimental Psychology, Faculty of Philosophy in Belgradesr
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/MESTD/inst-2020/200163/RS//sr
dc.rightsopenAccesssr
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceBook of Abstracts, XXIX Scientific Conference Empirical Studies in Psychology, March 31-April 2, Faculty of Philosophy, University of Belgradesr
dc.subjectlexical ambiguitysr
dc.subjectembodied cognition modelssr
dc.subjectsensorimotor normssr
dc.subjectsemantic similaritysr
dc.subjectpdp modelssr
dc.titleSimilarity of sensorimotor experience as a measure of the relatedness among the meanings of ambiguous wordssr
dc.typeconferenceObjectsr
dc.rights.licenseBYsr
dc.citation.spage37
dc.identifier.fulltexthttp://reff.f.bg.ac.rs/bitstream/id/12675/EIP2023_book_of_abstracts.pdf
dc.identifier.rcubhttps://hdl.handle.net/21.15107/rcub_reff_5125
dc.type.versionpublishedVersionsr


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